OT: ipv6 for dummies

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OT: ipv6 for dummies

D. Michael McIntyre-3
After trying to edit my video on Linux, I have concluded it is time to
move this project to Windows.  Video editors for Linux are either not
sophisticated enough or too sophisticated, and there is nothing in the
middle ground.

I need to move about 10 GB of data to my Windows laptop.

I installed Cygwin on the Windows box, and I was just going to scp the
files across.  I just need to know my IP address on my main box, and I'm
good to go.

So my IP address is apparently ipv6 now.

Uh.

So an hour of dicking around later, the files still have not been
transferred.  I am about to use a thumb drive to sneaker net the data in
a house that is saturated with local network options.

This is totally brain damaged.

Today, I feel old.
--
D. Michael McIntyre

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Video editing on Linux

ram-19
Hi Michael,

With respect to:

> After trying to edit my video on Linux, I have concluded it is time to
> move this project to Windows.  Video editors for Linux are either not
> sophisticated enough or too sophisticated, and there is nothing in the
> middle ground.
>

Try Cinelerra (https://cinelerra-cv.org/) it may be the middle ground you
are looking for.

Of course, video editing can be done in Blender (https://www.blender.org/)
which many of my friends use, but I've found Blender's learning curve
rather steep, almost cliff like.

OpenShot (http://www.openshot.org/) is relatively easy to use, but may not
be as full featured as you like.

As with music software there is an inherent trade-off between "easy to
use" and "full featured".

Since the vast majority of the movie industry uses Linux for video
manipulation, CGI, and editing, there are good reasons to stay with Linux
as your platform of choice.

Best regards,

Rich Marschall




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What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
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Re: Video editing on Linux

David Jones

On Aug 14, 2016 15:09, [hidden email] wrote:

>
> Hi Michael,
>
> With respect to:
>
> > After trying to edit my video on Linux, I have concluded it is time to
> > move this project to Windows.  Video editors for Linux are either not
> > sophisticated enough or too sophisticated, and there is nothing in the
> > middle ground.
> >
>
> Try Cinelerra (https://cinelerra-cv.org/) it may be the middle ground you
> are looking for.
>
> Of course, video editing can be done in Blender (https://www.blender.org/)
> which many of my friends use, but I've found Blender's learning curve
> rather steep, almost cliff like.
>
> OpenShot (http://www.openshot.org/) is relatively easy to use, but may not
> be as full featured as you like.
>
> As with music software there is an inherent trade-off between "easy to
> use" and "full featured".
>
> Since the vast majority of the movie industry uses Linux for video
> manipulation, CGI, and editing, there are good reasons to stay with Linux
> as your platform of choice.
>
> Best regards,
>
> Rich Marschall

Kdenlive worked fine for my limited needs. And made sense to this non-video maker.

David W. Jones
[hidden email]
authenticity, honesty, community
http://dancingtreefrog.com
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
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Re: Video editing on Linux

D. Michael McIntyre-3
In reply to this post by ram-19
On 08/14/2016 09:09 PM, [hidden email] wrote:

> Try Cinelerra (https://cinelerra-cv.org/) it may be the middle ground you
> are looking for.

Tried it.  OpenShot, Kdenlive, Pitivi, Blender, and finally Lightworks.
With the latter two, I'm not sure if they can do the job but I am sure I
can't use them to get the job done.  Lightworks on Linux isn't remotely
stable anyway.

--
D. Michael McIntyre

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
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Re: Video editing on Linux

Johan Vromans
In reply to this post by David Jones
On Sun, 14 Aug 2016 15:19:24 -1000
David Jones <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Kdenlive worked fine for my limited needs. And made sense to this
> non-video maker.

Kdenlive is rather intuitive (once you've got the hang of it) but it has
let me down many times by crashing or producing non-functional videos. If
it works for you, check your results and be happy.

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What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
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Re: Video editing on Linux

Lorenzo Sutton
In reply to this post by D. Michael McIntyre-3


On 15/08/2016 06:55, D. Michael McIntyre wrote:

> On 08/14/2016 09:09 PM, [hidden email] wrote:
>
>> Try Cinelerra (https://cinelerra-cv.org/) it may be the middle ground you
>> are looking for.
>
> Tried it.  OpenShot, Kdenlive, Pitivi, Blender, and finally Lightworks.
> With the latter two, I'm not sure if they can do the job but I am sure I
> can't use them to get the job done.  Lightworks on Linux isn't remotely
> stable anyway.
>

Once upon a time I really got into cinelerra, then it got harder and
harder to compile it as well as to import/export so I moved to kdenlive
(with a bit of Openshot here and there). The nice thing about kdelive is
that it seems to 'just' work (the drawback is that you need to install
half of KDE and that sucks if it's not your DE).
I tend to prefer video editors with tracks, maybe because I'm more used
to music software. Recently I tried Shotcut, and it looks like a good
compromise between simple interface and controls, decent presets and
usability.

One last note, on Linux I think if you want to do video editing it's
good to always have an ffmpeg installation around for conversion etc. ;)

My two cents.
Lorenzo

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Re: Video editing on Linux

ram-19
Lorenzo Sutton wrote:

>
> Once upon a time I really got into cinelerra, then it got harder and
> harder to compile it as well as to import/export so I moved to kdenlive
> (with a bit of Openshot here and there). The nice thing about kdelive is
> that it seems to 'just' work (the drawback is that you need to install
> half of KDE and that sucks if it's not your DE).
> I tend to prefer video editors with tracks, maybe because I'm more used
> to music software. Recently I tried Shotcut, and it looks like a good
> compromise between simple interface and controls, decent presets and
> usability.
>
> One last note, on Linux I think if you want to do video editing it's
> good to always have an ffmpeg installation around for conversion etc. ;)
>
> My two cents.
> Lorenzo
>
>

One thing I really like about both Cinelerra and Blender is they allow one
to use clusters of Linux boxen so one can really throw alot of "grunt" at
rendering.  Totally agree about the use of ffmpeg for various conversions,
especially if one's source material has various resolutions, formats, and
frame rates.

All Linux video editors (and ffmpeg) can benefit mightily from having GPU
subsystem with several thousand cores with the proprietary AMD/ATI or
NVidia drivers installed along with their corresponding OpenGL and OpenCL
libraries and routines.

My friends tell me Blender can do anything, except apparently be easy for
me to learn how to use ;-)  Blender rendering services on remote "cloud"
supercomputers is also readily available if you have the Internet speeds
to use them (we don't in Australia with its aged copper twisted pair
infrastructure).

Hope this helpful.

Rich




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Re: Video editing on Linux

David Jones
On 08/15/2016 10:33 PM, [hidden email] wrote:

> Lorenzo Sutton wrote:
>
>> Once upon a time I really got into cinelerra, then it got harder and
>> harder to compile it as well as to import/export so I moved to kdenlive
>> (with a bit of Openshot here and there). The nice thing about kdelive is
>> that it seems to 'just' work (the drawback is that you need to install
>> half of KDE and that sucks if it's not your DE).
>> I tend to prefer video editors with tracks, maybe because I'm more used
>> to music software. Recently I tried Shotcut, and it looks like a good
>> compromise between simple interface and controls, decent presets and
>> usability.
>>
>> One last note, on Linux I think if you want to do video editing it's
>> good to always have an ffmpeg installation around for conversion etc. ;)
>>
>> My two cents.
>> Lorenzo
>
> One thing I really like about both Cinelerra and Blender is they allow one
> to use clusters of Linux boxen so one can really throw alot of "grunt" at
> rendering.  Totally agree about the use of ffmpeg for various conversions,
> especially if one's source material has various resolutions, formats, and
> frame rates.
>
> All Linux video editors (and ffmpeg) can benefit mightily from having GPU
> subsystem with several thousand cores with the proprietary AMD/ATI or
> NVidia drivers installed along with their corresponding OpenGL and OpenCL
> libraries and routines.
>
> My friends tell me Blender can do anything, except apparently be easy for
> me to learn how to use ;-)  Blender rendering services on remote "cloud"
> supercomputers is also readily available if you have the Internet speeds
> to use them (we don't in Australia with its aged copper twisted pair
> infrastructure).
>
> Hope this helpful.

I think the power and complexity of Blender is way beyond what Michael
was looking for.


--
David W. Jones
[hidden email]
authenticity, honesty, community
http://dancingtreefrog.com

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